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Reconceptualizing stress in cancer treatment
Psychological stress alone does not cause cancer but it can interfere with the immune system s response to cancer cells, which may increase the potential of metastasis, and cause neurochemical imbalance that may impact the survival of a patient with cancer. In a Theory and Hypothesis paper titled The preparatory set A novel approach to understanding stress, trauma, and the bodymind therapies, published in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience , Dartmouth investi ...
Science Daily - Sun. Jul 26
Mushrooms boost immunity, suggests research
Could a mushroom a day help keep the doctor away A new University of Florida study shows increased immunity in people who ate a cooked shiitake mushroom every day for four weeks. Of the thousands of mushroom species globally, about 20 are used for culinary purposes. Shiitake mushrooms are native to Asia and are cultivated for their culinary and medicinal value. In a 2011 study led by UF Food Science and Human Nutrition Professor Sue Percival, 52 healthy ad ...
Science Daily - Sun. Jul 26
Exploring treatment options for women with fibroids
A 47-year-old African-American woman has heavy menstrual bleeding and iron-deficiency anemia. She reports the frequent need to urinate during the night and throughout the day. A colonoscopy is negative and an ultrasonography shows a modestly enlarged uterus with three uterine fibroids, noncancerous growths of the uterus. She is not planning to become pregnant. What are her options Elizabeth Ebbie Stewart, M.D., chair of Reproductive Endocrinology at Mayo C ...
Science Daily - Sun. Jul 26
Alternative providers of GP services perform worse than traditional practices
A new study published by the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine has found that alternative providers of primary care in the NHS, including private sector companies, do not perform as well as traditional GP practices. Alternative providers have been contracted to offer primary care in the NHS since 2004 under reforms designed to increase competition. The study, by researchers at Imperial College London, found that these providers performed worse than ...
Science Daily - Sun. Jul 26
Non-hormonal management of menopausal vasomotor symptoms
Elsevier journal Maturitas today announced the publication of a position statement by the European Menopause and Andropause Society EMAS covering non-hormonal management of menopausal vasomotor symptoms. Hot flashes are a common menopausal symptom. They tend to intensify during the perimenopause and usually subside within 5 years after the final menstrual period. However in some women frequent hot flashes are a long term problem and may last for more than ...
Science Daily - Sun. Jul 26
Nurses cut stress 40 percent with relaxation steps at work
A study by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center found that a workplace mindfulness-based intervention reduced stress levels of employees exposed to a highly stressful occupational environment. Members of a surgical intensive care unit at the large academic medical center were randomized to a stress-reduction intervention or a control group. The 8-week group mindfulness-based intervention included mindfulness, gentle stretching, yo ...
Science Daily - Sun. Jul 26
Stress relief techniques help cancer patients overcome fear of treatment
A service evaluation at The Christie NHS Foundation Trust in Manchester, England, has shown the benefit of rapid stress management techniques RSMTs to help cancer patients who experience procedure-related stress. Cancer patients benefit from stress relief techniques and complementary therapy to manage their fears of medical procedures, according to a new service evaluation study. Patients experiencing distress related to medical procedures were able to ach ...
Science Daily - Sun. Jul 26
Yoga and chronic pain have opposite effects on brain gray matter
Chronic pain is known to cause brain anatomy changes and impairments, but yoga can be an important tool for preventing or even reversing the effects of chronic pain on the brain, according to a National Institutes of Health NIH official speaking at the American Pain Society s annual meeting. M. Catherine Bushnell, PhD, scientific director, Division of Intramural Research, National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, NIH, explained in a plenary ...
Science Daily - Sun. Jul 26
Drinking chamomile decreases risk of death in older Mexican American women
Researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have found that drinking chamomile tea was associated with a decreased risk of death from all causes in Mexican-American American women over 65. The findings were recently published online in The Gerontologist . Chamomile is one of the oldest, most-widely used and well-documented medicinal plants in the world and has been recommended for a variety of healing applications. It is currently ...
Science Daily - Sun. Jul 26
Attitudes about complementary and alternative medicine predict use among cance...
A cancer patient s expectations about the benefits of complementary and alternative CAM and their perceived access to CAM therapies are likely to guide whether or not they will use those options, according to a new study published ahead of print in the journal CANCER from researchers at Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania. The team found that attitudes and beliefs about CAM were found to be a better predictor of CAM usage than socio-de ...
Science Daily - Sun. Jul 26
Cultural health beliefs and social networks crucial in South Asian people's ma...
Researchers from The University of Manchester in collaboration with Keele and Southampton Universities have published new findings which shed light on the poor outcomes of South Asian people with diabetes in the UK. Analysis of interviews with South Asian people, published in a paper in the journal BMC Family Practice, shows that especially among first generation immigrants, fatalistic and treatment beliefs are often a hindrance to managing the condition. ...
Science Daily - Sun. Jul 26
Component in green tea may help reduce prostate cancer in men at high risk
Prostate cancer is the second most common type of cancer in men and is predicted to result in an estimated 220,000 cases in the United States in 2015. In recent years, an emphasis has been placed on chemoprevention -- the use of agents to prevent the development or progression of prostate cancer. A team of researchers led by Nagi B. Kumar, Ph.D., R.D., F.A.D.A. at Moffitt Cancer Center recently published results of a randomized trial that assessed the safe ...
Science Daily - Sun. Jul 26