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Why Pleasant Mealtimes Could Be Key to Alzheimer's Care
Making meals more enjoyable for people with dementia might reduce their risk of malnutrition and dehydration, researchers report. Family-style meals and music, in particular, showed promise for improving eating and drinking habits, British researchers found. It is probably not just what people with dementia eat and drink that is important for their nutritional well-being and quality of life -- but a holistic mix of where they eat and drink, the atmosphere, ...
Healthday - Wed. Jun 28
Turning to an Ancient Art to Help Ease PTSD in Veterans
The age-old practice of Tai Chi shows promise in treating post-traumatic stress disorder PTSD in veterans, new research shows. The study was small -- just 17 U.S. veterans -- and involved four introductory sessions of Tai Chi, the Chinese exercise regimen that involves slow, fluid movements. A team led by Barbara Niles, of Boston University School of Medicine, said the program helped ease the veterans PTSD symptoms. Those symptoms included intrusive though ...
Healthday - Wed. Jun 28
How 'Mindful Eating' Can Keep Kids Slim
Most childhood obesity-prevention programs stress calorie counting and exercise. But one pediatrician likes to emphasize an approach called mindful eating instead. Mindful eating is a more compassionate and holistic way to approach healthy eating. It not only focuses on what foods we eat, but on how our bodies feel, said Dr. Lenna Liu, a pediatrician at Seattle Children s Hospital. It allows us to pay attention to hunger and fullness, emotional connections ...
Healthday - Wed. Jun 28
Regular Phys Ed Builds More Than Fitness
Rules requiring regular physical education for young teens stem from good science, researchers say. Frequent phys ed classes not only improve fitness, they also encourage healthy living, finds a study from Oregon State University. Researchers looked at more than 400 students, ages 12 to 15. They found that more than one in five received no physical education, and only about 27 percent met federal government physical activity guidelines. Nearly 40 percent w ...
Healthday - Wed. Jun 28
Healing Hands: Massage May Ease Chronic Back Pain
Chronic low back pain can be a challenge to treat, but new research suggests that massage therapy may provide some relief. Current medical guidelines actually recommend massage therapy prior to the use of opioid medications for lower back pain, explained William Elder, the study s principle investigator. Yet even with those guidelines, physicians and nurse practitioners are not recommending massage therapy, said Elder. He s with the University of Kentucky ...
Healthday - Wed. Jun 28
Consider Acupuncture for Incontinence, Not Certain Infertility Cases
Acupuncture, a 3,000-year-old healing technique, received mixed reviews in two new studies from China -- one focusing on incontinence and the other on a cause of female infertility. A research team found acupuncture did improve symptoms of stress incontinence -- an involuntarily loss of urine, such as when a woman sneezes or coughs. But in a separate study, another team of researchers determined that acupuncture did not help women who were infertile becaus ...
Healthday - Wed. Jun 28
When Is an Opioid Safe to Take?
Many people in pain are apprehensive about taking an opioid painkiller to ease their suffering, and rightfully so. Widespread use of opioids for pain has led to an epidemic of addiction in the United States. Forty lives are lost to prescription drug overdose every day, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But an opioid painkiller, such as oxycodone Oxycontin, Percocet or hydrocodone Vicoprofen can sometimes be the best option f ...
Healthday - Wed. Jun 28
Yoga Soothes Back Pain in Study
If you suffer from chronic low back pain, yoga might bring you as much relief as physical therapy, a new trial shows. The less positive finding Both therapies fell far short of helping everyone. People who did yoga or physical therapy reported less pain on average after 12 weeks -- an improvement that held up over a year. And some were able to cut out pain medication. Still, many failed to get meaningful relief, the researchers noted. Experts said the find ...
Healthday - Wed. Jun 28
Technology should be used to boost empathy-based medicine
Existing digital technologies must be exploited to enable a paradigm shift in current healthcare delivery which focuses on tests, treatments and targets rather than the therapeutic benefits of empathy. Writing in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine , Dr Jeremy Howick and Dr Sian Rees of the Oxford Empathy Programme , say a new paradigm of empathy-based medicine is needed to improve patient outcomes, reduce practitioner burnout and save money. Empa ...
EurekAlert - Wed. Jun 28
Natural health product regulation in Canada needs to go further to protect con...
Health Canada s proposed changes to natural health product regulation are a good step forward, but they need to go further to protect consumers, argues Dr. Matthew Stanbrook in an editorial in CMAJ Canadian Medical Association Journal . Health Canada is poised to overhaul its regulatory system for natural health products, which is welcome and long overdue. However, there are troubling signs already that new regulations could be diluted past the point of po ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Jun 27
'Own-point-of-view' video method leverages power of perception to improve emer...
DES PLAINES, IL--The own-point-of-view perspective video technique, coupled with a subjective re situ interview, provides a better understanding of how physicians make clinical decisions in an authentic treatment setting, compared with the conventional external perspective. That is the primary finding of a study to be published in the July 2017 issue of Academic Emergency Medicine AEM , a journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine. The study, b ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Jun 27
Mixed results on effectiveness of acupuncture to treat stress urinary incontin...
Electroacupuncture improved stress urinary incontinence -that s when a woman can experience an involuntary loss of urine such as when sneezing or coughing - but acupuncture did not increase the likelihood of childbirth among women with infertility, according to two studies published by JAMA . Stress urinary incontinence SUI is an involuntary loss of urine on physical exertion, sneezing, or coughing. Electroacupuncture involving the lumbosacral region near ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Jun 27