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Avoid Getting Scorched by 'Hot Yoga'
Doing yoga in a room heated to between 90 and 105 degrees -- known as hot yoga -- is increasing in popularity, but it may not be for everyone, an expert warns. Exertion in high temperatures may be dangerous for people with certain health conditions, said Diana Zotos, a yoga instructor and physical therapist in the rehabilitation department at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City. If you have sensitivity to heat, if you ve ever had heat stroke ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Science Shows How Massage Eases Sore Muscles
Having a massage after strenuous exercise not only feels good, it reduces inflammation in muscles at the cellular level, researchers have found. Massage also appears to promote the growth of new mitochondria in skeletal muscle. Mitochondria are cells energy-producing powerhouses, explained the researchers at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging and McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. For the study, the investigators conducted genetic analyses of ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Chocolate a Sweet Remedy for Many Ills?
International researchers have uncovered even more healthy properties of flavanols -- the antioxidants found in cocoa beans. Eighteen chocolate-centered studies -- including investigations of how cocoa might affect blood pressure, heart disease, painful nerve disorders and cancer risk -- were to be presented Wednesday at the American Chemical Society s annual meeting in San Diego. Some caveats Most of the studies have not yet been accepted for publication ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
DNA Testing Finds Allergens, Toxins in Traditional Chinese Medicines
DNA analysis of traditional Chinese medicines that were seized by Australian customs officials revealed that many contained plant ingredients in quantities and combinations that could have produced allergic or even toxic reactions among consumers. What s more, the high-tech investigation unearthed evidence that some of the medicines also contained animal parts from species that have been officially recognized as either vulnerable, endangered or critically ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Probiotic Products May Prevent Antibiotic-Linked Diarrhea
Consuming probiotic-rich foods may decrease the risk of diarrhea for patients who are taking antibiotics, a new study suggests. Probiotics are live microorganisms that are found naturally in foods such as yogurt and are believed to provide health benefits. About 30 percent of patients who take antibiotics will experience diarrhea because the drugs disrupt gastrointestinal microbes, and diarrhea is one of the main reasons people don t adhere to antibiotic t ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Many Parents of Kids With Autism Don't Put Faith in Pediatricians
Many parents of children with an autism spectrum disorder don t feel they can turn to their pediatricians for advice on treatments, a new study finds. Likewise, many pediatricians don t think they have the knowledge -- or time -- to devote to children with autism, with some citing reimbursement policies that don t allow for payment for lengthier appointments or for managing complex cases. The pediatricians interviewed for the study also said they felt espe ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Exercise, Meditation Can Beat Back Cold, Flu, Study Finds
New research suggests that regular exercise or meditation may be among the best ways to reduce acute respiratory infections. A small study of 149 active and sedentary adults aged 50 years and older compared the preventive effects of moderate exercise and mindful meditation on the severity of respiratory infections, such as cold and flu, during a full winter season in Wisconsin. The researchers found that those participants who started a daily exercise rout ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Meditation May Help Fight Loneliness, Study Says
A simple form of meditation can help stave off feelings of loneliness and may cut the body s inflammatory response -- which can trigger serious illness -- to distressing emotions, a small new study suggests. Researchers from the University of California, Los Angeles and Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh found that older adults who participated in an eight-week program of mindfulness-based stress reduction -- which attunes the mind to the present and ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Spirituality Central to Traditional Chinese Medicine, Study Finds
Spirituality is the key to successful treatment using traditional Chinese medicine, a new study says. Researchers analyzed the origins and development of traditional Chinese medicine, and concluded that it is profoundly influenced by Chinese philosophy and religion. They focused on these aspects of traditional Chinese medicine its history and fundamental beliefs spirituality in traditional Chinese healing rituals and pharmacy spirituality in health mainten ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Hypnosis May Ease Hot Flashes in Postmenopausal Women
Hypnosis may help reduce hot flashes in postmenopausal women, cutting down their frequency as much as 74 percent, researchers say. Hot flashes affect about 80 percent of women as they go through menopause. The sudden rush of heat can be followed by chills and can reduce quality of life. Researcher Gary Elkins, director of the Mind-Body Medicine Research Laboratory at Baylor University in Waco, Texas, assigned 187 women who had at least seven hot flashes da ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Controversial Alternative Heart Treatment Shows Hint of Benefit
A controversial alternative treatment known as chelation therapy, in which a special infusion seeks to remove heavy metals from the body, did show modest benefits for heart patients, researchers report. The trial -- the first large, long-term study of its kind on the issue -- was funded by the U.S. National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine and the U.S. National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. However, its findings are not likely to settle ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Brain Scan Study Suggests Docs 'Feel' Your Pain
Some doctors may really feel a patient s pain -- and also experience relief after they ve given the patient treatment, new research suggests. In the new study, scientists scanned the brains of doctors as they believed they were offering patients pain-relieving therapy. The more empathetic the doctor, the more brain activation the researchers found. It s the doctor side of the placebo effect, said researcher Ted Kaptchuk, director of the Program in Placebo ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18