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Meditation May Help Fight Loneliness, Study Says
A simple form of meditation can help stave off feelings of loneliness and may cut the body s inflammatory response -- which can trigger serious illness -- to distressing emotions, a small new study suggests. Researchers from the University of California, Los Angeles and Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh found that older adults who participated in an eight-week program of mindfulness-based stress reduction -- which attunes the mind to the present and ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Spirituality Central to Traditional Chinese Medicine, Study Finds
Spirituality is the key to successful treatment using traditional Chinese medicine, a new study says. Researchers analyzed the origins and development of traditional Chinese medicine, and concluded that it is profoundly influenced by Chinese philosophy and religion. They focused on these aspects of traditional Chinese medicine its history and fundamental beliefs spirituality in traditional Chinese healing rituals and pharmacy spirituality in health mainten ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Hypnosis May Ease Hot Flashes in Postmenopausal Women
Hypnosis may help reduce hot flashes in postmenopausal women, cutting down their frequency as much as 74 percent, researchers say. Hot flashes affect about 80 percent of women as they go through menopause. The sudden rush of heat can be followed by chills and can reduce quality of life. Researcher Gary Elkins, director of the Mind-Body Medicine Research Laboratory at Baylor University in Waco, Texas, assigned 187 women who had at least seven hot flashes da ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Controversial Alternative Heart Treatment Shows Hint of Benefit
A controversial alternative treatment known as chelation therapy, in which a special infusion seeks to remove heavy metals from the body, did show modest benefits for heart patients, researchers report. The trial -- the first large, long-term study of its kind on the issue -- was funded by the U.S. National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine and the U.S. National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. However, its findings are not likely to settle ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Brain Scan Study Suggests Docs 'Feel' Your Pain
Some doctors may really feel a patient s pain -- and also experience relief after they ve given the patient treatment, new research suggests. In the new study, scientists scanned the brains of doctors as they believed they were offering patients pain-relieving therapy. The more empathetic the doctor, the more brain activation the researchers found. It s the doctor side of the placebo effect, said researcher Ted Kaptchuk, director of the Program in Placebo ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Tai Chi Might Help Stroke Survivors Avoid Falls
The ancient Chinese discipline of Tai Chi may help modern-day stroke patients avoid debilitating falls, a small new study suggests. Stroke survivors suffer seven times as many falls as healthy adults. These falls can cause fractures, decrease mobility and increase the fear of falling, which can lead to social isolation or dependence on others, the researchers noted. Learning how to find and maintain your balance after a stroke is a challenge, lead author R ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Study: Mega Vitamins Won't Help After Heart Attack, Chelation Treatment Might
There s mixed news from a much-anticipated clinical trial for people who ve suffered a heart attack While a study found that daily high doses of vitamins and minerals did nothing to improve patient outcomes, there was a hint that controversial chelation therapy might. Still, the lead researcher said he s not ready to recommend chelation therapy, in which doctors give patients high-dose vitamins along with special infusions that seek to leach heavy metals f ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Modest Cardiac Benefit From Chelation Therapy Not Enough to OK Use: Experts
Results from a major trial on controversial chelation therapy for patients with a history of heart attack find a modest benefit from the expensive treatment, but experts conclude there s no clear evidence supporting its use. Still, groups that advocate for chelation and groups that oppose chelation will both find comfort in the results, said one expert not connected to the study, Dr. Stephen Green, associate chairman in the department of cardiology at Nort ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Nutrient Therapy Won't Help ICU Patients: Study
Replenishing certain nutrients in critically ill patients may not be the best therapy for them, new research suggests. Giving supplements of the amino acid glutamine in intravenous fluids was linked to a nearly 30 percent increase in the risk of death, according to the study. The researchers also found that replacing antioxidants didn t appear to lower the risk of death or organ failure. When you get sick, your body has [internal] mechanisms to help you ge ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Fish Oil Pills Might Cut Diabetes Risk, Researchers Say
Fish oil supplements could help reduce the risk for type 2 diabetes, new research suggests. The supplements, also known as omega-3 fatty acids, increase levels of a hormone called adiponectin that s linked to insulin sensitivity, Harvard researchers found. Higher levels of this hormone in the bloodstream have also been linked to a lower risk for heart disease. While prior animal studies found fish oil increased circulating adiponectin, whether similar effe ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Probiotics Not Warranted for Seniors Taking Antibiotics: Study
Giving probiotics to older adults who are prescribed antibiotics does not reduce their risk of diarrhea, a new study finds. Diarrhea is a common and sometimes life-threatening side effect of antibiotics in elderly patients. Some previous research has suggested that giving these patients probiotic supplements might lower the risk of diarrhea, and the practice has become routine in some hospitals. This study included nearly 3,000 hospital patients, aged 65 a ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Study Questions Fish Oil Brain Claims
If you eat a lot of fish or take fish oil supplements hoping to boost your brain health, a new study has disappointing findings for you. The study, published online Sept. 25 in the journal Neurology , found no difference in memory and thinking test scores based on levels of omega-3 fatty acids in the blood. We looked at the association of blood biomarkers of [omega-3 fatty acids] and measure of cognitive [thinking] function and found no statistically signi ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18