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Does Meditation Boost Brain Health?
Following up on previous research showing that people who have practiced meditation for a long time have more gray matter in their brains, a small new study finds that their brains also shrink less as they age and they have stronger connections in the brain itself. This means that brain cells may better relay electrical signals, researchers said. Our results suggest that long-term meditators have white-matter fibers that are either more numerous, more dens ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Chinese Herbs Equal to Tamiflu in Reducing H1N1 Fever: Study
A traditional Chinese herbal treatment may reduce fever from H1N1 swine flu influenza just as well as the prescription medication Tamiflu, a new study suggests. For thousands of years, Chinese herbs have been used to treat influenza, study co-authors Dr. Chen Wang and Dr. Bin Cao, of Beijing Chao-Yang Hospital, Capital Medical University, in China, said in an email. The pandemic influenza 2009 gave us the opportunity to evaluate a standard Chinese herb for ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
To the Brain, Seeing a Caress Is as Good as Getting One
Seeing someone else being caressed causes your brain to react as strongly as if you were being caressed, researchers have found. In the study, MRI scans were used to measure the brain activity of volunteers while they were stroked either slowly or quickly with a soft brush. Not surprisingly, the strongest brain reaction occurred when the participants were being stroked slowly, said the research team at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden. However, the i ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Science Probes How Probiotic Yogurts Affect Your Gut
Researchers have put the health promises of popular probiotic yogurts to the test and found they may alter the way in which food is metabolized. But whether that means probiotic foods and supplements can improve your health remains to be seen, they said. Federal regulatory agencies are increasingly interested in evaluating all the health claims being made by probiotic food manufacturers, said study co-author Dr. Jeffrey Gordon, a biologist and director of ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Meditation Can 'Turn Off' Regions of the Brain
A new study finds that people skilled at meditation seem able to turn off areas of the brain associated with daydreaming and psychiatric disorders such as autism and schizophrenia. Learning more about how meditation works could help advance research into a number of diseases, according to lead author Dr. Judson Brewer, an assistant professor of psychiatry at Yale University. He and his colleagues used functional MRI to assess brain activity in experienced ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Spinal Manipulation, Home Exercise May Ease Neck Pain
Spinal manipulation and home exercise are more effective at relieving neck pain in the long term than medications, according to new research. People undergoing spinal manipulation therapy for neck pain also reported greater satisfaction than people receiving medication or doing home exercises. We found that there are some viable treatment options for neck pain, said Gert Bronfort, vice president of research at the Wolfe-Harris Center for Clinical Studies a ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Avoid Getting Scorched by 'Hot Yoga'
Doing yoga in a room heated to between 90 and 105 degrees -- known as hot yoga -- is increasing in popularity, but it may not be for everyone, an expert warns. Exertion in high temperatures may be dangerous for people with certain health conditions, said Diana Zotos, a yoga instructor and physical therapist in the rehabilitation department at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City. If you have sensitivity to heat, if you ve ever had heat stroke ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Science Shows How Massage Eases Sore Muscles
Having a massage after strenuous exercise not only feels good, it reduces inflammation in muscles at the cellular level, researchers have found. Massage also appears to promote the growth of new mitochondria in skeletal muscle. Mitochondria are cells energy-producing powerhouses, explained the researchers at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging and McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. For the study, the investigators conducted genetic analyses of ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Chocolate a Sweet Remedy for Many Ills?
International researchers have uncovered even more healthy properties of flavanols -- the antioxidants found in cocoa beans. Eighteen chocolate-centered studies -- including investigations of how cocoa might affect blood pressure, heart disease, painful nerve disorders and cancer risk -- were to be presented Wednesday at the American Chemical Society s annual meeting in San Diego. Some caveats Most of the studies have not yet been accepted for publication ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
DNA Testing Finds Allergens, Toxins in Traditional Chinese Medicines
DNA analysis of traditional Chinese medicines that were seized by Australian customs officials revealed that many contained plant ingredients in quantities and combinations that could have produced allergic or even toxic reactions among consumers. What s more, the high-tech investigation unearthed evidence that some of the medicines also contained animal parts from species that have been officially recognized as either vulnerable, endangered or critically ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Probiotic Products May Prevent Antibiotic-Linked Diarrhea
Consuming probiotic-rich foods may decrease the risk of diarrhea for patients who are taking antibiotics, a new study suggests. Probiotics are live microorganisms that are found naturally in foods such as yogurt and are believed to provide health benefits. About 30 percent of patients who take antibiotics will experience diarrhea because the drugs disrupt gastrointestinal microbes, and diarrhea is one of the main reasons people don t adhere to antibiotic t ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Many Parents of Kids With Autism Don't Put Faith in Pediatricians
Many parents of children with an autism spectrum disorder don t feel they can turn to their pediatricians for advice on treatments, a new study finds. Likewise, many pediatricians don t think they have the knowledge -- or time -- to devote to children with autism, with some citing reimbursement policies that don t allow for payment for lengthier appointments or for managing complex cases. The pediatricians interviewed for the study also said they felt espe ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18