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Massage May Improve Blood Flow While Easing Muscle Soreness: Study
Massage therapy can help ease sore muscles and improve blood flow for people who are active as well as for those who do not exercise, a small study finds. Those effects can last for more than 72 hours, researchers found. People with poor circulation or limited ability to move are among those who could benefit most from massage therapy, they noted. Our study validates the value of massage in exercise and injury, which has been previously recognized but base ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Laughter May Work Like Meditation in the Brain
Laughter triggers brain waves similar to those associated with meditation, according to a small new study. It also found that other forms of stimulation produce different types of brain waves. The study included 31 people whose brain waves were monitored while they watched humorous, spiritual or distressing video clips. While watching the humorous videos, the volunteers brains had high levels of gamma waves, which are the same ones produced during meditati ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Many Don't Want to Be Alone With Their Thoughts
Some people would rather do anything -- even hurt themselves -- than spend quiet time with their own thoughts, a new study finds. Researchers conducted a series of experiments with volunteers aged 18 to 77 and found that they generally did not like spending even short periods of time alone in a room with nothing to do but think or daydream. The majority of them preferred external activities such as listening to music or using a smartphone. Some of the part ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
U.S. Pledges Millions to Study Ways to Ease Soldiers' Pain
The U.S. government announced Thursday that it will launch a massive research effort to explore alternative ways of managing chronic pain among members of the military. Investigators will also examine the use of alternative treatments for pain-related conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder PTSD , drug abuse and sleep problems. The 13 research projects will cost a total of nearly 22 million over five years, and all will be conducted at Veterans A ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Beware Claims That Activated Charcoal Can Cure Gut Troubles
A man who hoped to detoxify his body with a supplement known as activated charcoal may have instead triggered a case of the intestinal disorder known as colitis. Activated charcoal is a supplement that soaks up gases and odors, making it a common treatment for people with flatulence. It s also purported to be a treatment for colitis, according to a new report detailing the man s condition. While it s not clear if the over-the-counter supplement actually ma ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
FDA: Supplements, Meds Can Be Dangerous Mix
Taking vitamins or other dietary supplements along with medication can be dangerous, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns. Dietary supplements can alter the absorption and metabolism of prescription and over-the-counter medications, the FDA said. Some dietary supplements may increase the effect of your medication, and other dietary supplements may decrease it, Robert Mozersky, a medical officer at the FDA, explained in an agency news release. For ex ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Many Consumers Misled About Bogus Weight-Loss Supplements, Survey Says
Think a pill you saw advertised on the Internet can miraculously help you shed unwanted pounds You re not alone A new Consumer Reports survey finds many Americans are misinformed about the quality and effectiveness of these supplements. The barrage of advertising leads us to think there s a magic way to melt away 10 pounds -- even when we have no evidence that supplements work, Dr. Pieter Cohen, a physician at Harvard Medical School who studies supplements ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Cancer Doctors Don't Discuss Herbs, Supplements With Patients
Despite concerns about potentially dangerous interactions between cancer treatments and herbs and other supplements, most cancer doctors don t talk to their patients about these products, new research found. Fewer than half of cancer doctors -- oncologists -- bring up the subject of herbs or supplements with their patients, the researchers found. Many doctors cited their own lack of information as a major reason why they skip that conversation. Lack of kno ...
Healthday - Fri. Sep 18
Hypertensive patients benefit from acupuncture treatments, UCI study finds
Irvine, Calif., Aug. 19, 2015 -- Patients with hypertension treated with acupuncture experienced drops in their blood pressure that lasted up to a month and a half, researchers with the Susan Samueli Center for Integrative Medicine have found. Their work is the first to scientifically confirm that this ancient Chinese practice is beneficial in treating mild to moderate hypertension, and it indicates that regular use could help people control their blood pr ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Sep 18
Even Sham Acupuncture Eases Low Back Pain
Six months of traditional Chinese or even sham acupuncture treatment appeared more effective than conventional treatment for low back pain, says a German study of almost 1,200 patients. Traditional verum acupuncture involves needling of fixed points and additional points on the body to a depth of 5 to 40 millimeters, while sham acupuncture involves needling to a depth of 1 to 3 millimeters into the lower back, avoiding known pressure points. Patients in th ...
Healthday - Thu. Sep 17
Brain 'Switch' Helps Doctors Deal With Patients' Pain
Doctors are able to switch off the part of their brain that helps them appreciate the pain patients experience during treatment, and instead turn on a brain area that controls emotions, according a study by American and Taiwanese researchers. Because they sometimes have to inflict pain on patients while treating them, doctors have to develop the ability not to be distracted by the suffering of patients, explained co-author Jean Decety, a psychology and psy ...
Healthday - Thu. Sep 17
Experts Issue Guidelines on Treating Low Back Pain
Primary care doctors shouldn t routinely order MRIs, CT scans and other diagnostic tests for patients with nonspecific low back pain, according to new joint guidelines released by the American College of Physicians and the American Pain Society. The guidelines, which are published in the Oct. 2 issue of the journal Annals of Internal Medicine , include a method to guide primary care doctors and other clinicians in gathering and interpreting information dur ...
Healthday - Thu. Sep 17